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Fact Check: Pakistan fails to test 13th Test of Ghaznavi Missile

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Fake news claims: A video widely viewed on Social Media claiming the failure of the Ghaznavi Missile test in Pakistan yet again.

पाकिस्तान की गजनवी मिसाइल का 13वां टेस्ट जो फेल हो गया।
300Km तक जानेवाली मिसाइल 36Km पर गिरी कागज की तरह जल कर खत्म हुई।

पाकिस्तान की गजनवी मिसाइल का 13वां टेस्ट जो फेल हो गया, ये साले खुद ही खुद को ख़त्म कर लेंगे किसी दूसरे की जरूरत नहीं पड़ेगी...
300Km तक जानेवाली मिसाइल 36Km पर गिरी कागज की तरह जल कर खत्म हुई।
पाकिस्तान की गजनवी मिसाइल ने फैसला किया है वो अपना मुल्क छोड़कर काफिरों के देश नहीं जाएगी

Facts Check Verdict: False

News Verification: The viral video claims that Pak failed for the 13th time to test the Ghaznavi Missile.

Pakistan on 23rd Jan 2020, conducted a successful training launch of nuclear-capable surface-to-surface ballistic missile 'Ghaznavi', which can strike targets up to 290 kilometers.

The video shared as Pakistan failure to test Ghaznavi Missile is an old video of A Russian Proton-M rocket carrying three navigation satellites crashes soon after takeoff from Kazakhstan's Baikonur Cosmodrome. The Spectacular footage showed the rocket veering off its trajectory just seconds after its launch at 0638 am (0238 GMT), before erupting into a ball of flames and releasing highly toxic rocket fuel into the air. The Russian space agency Roskosmos, said the accident caused no damage or casualties.

As per the YouTube information, The Russian rocket carrying three navigation satellites has crashed to earth. A state-run television station captured the moment. Within seconds of blast off it was clear the Proton-M booster rocket was in trouble as it veered off course.

It had taken off from the Russian-leased Baikonur launch facility in Kazakhstan. Reportedly all the staff were in bunkers and there were no injuries as the rocket lost control and headed back to earth. Russia's space agency Roscosmos said the accident had been caused by the emergency switch-off of the rocket's engines 17 seconds into the flight. On board was around 170 tonnes of heptyl, a highly toxic propellant, which exploded on impact as it crashed and burned in a ball of fire. The satellites were meant for Russia's troubled Glonass satellite navigation system, which is the country's answer to the US GPS system.





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